Book Fort at Pitchfork Music Festival 2014

By Naomi Huffman

Pitchfork Music Festival is July 18 - 20 in Union Park. 

The Book Fort at Pitchfork Music Festival celebrates what earned Pitchfork prominence in the first place—quality writing. Add a literary bent to your Pitchfork plans with workshops, readings, and a book fair, held all weekend long at Book Fort.

Join our Facebook event for updates each day.  

WEEKEND SCHEDULE:

Friday, July 18:
6:00 PM - Tiny Hardcore, Curbside Splendor, Pitchfork, and CCLaP present James Tadd Adcox, Jess Hopper, Mason Johnson, Tim Kinsella, and Cassandra Troyan

Saturday, July 19:

2:30 PM - POETRY presents Anthony Madrid, Tyler Mills, and Phillip B.

 
Wannabe - 65

By Chris Prunckle

AllNewWannabe_13_Web.jpg

Wannabe is a blog series by Chicago area artist Chris Prunckle documenting his trials and tribulations as a wannabe artist. Check back next week for a new posting.

Chris Prunckle is a graphic designer, illustrator and comic book artist banished to the suburbs of Chicago. Though an advertising industry minion by day, he slaves his nights away creating a mad little world.  He’s previously worked on the comics Fisted, Bonesetter, and The Scarab.  Follow him at @midjipress.

 
Wannabe - 64

By Chris Prunckle

AllNewWannabe_12_Web.jpg

Wannabe is a blog series by Chicago area artist Chris Prunckle documenting his trials and tribulations as a wannabe artist. Check back next week for a new posting.

Chris Prunckle is a graphic designer, illustrator and comic book artist banished to the suburbs of Chicago. Though an advertising industry minion by day, he slaves his nights away creating a mad little world.  He’s previously worked on the comics Fisted, Bonesetter, and The Scarab.  Follow him at @midjipress.

 
Wannabe - 63

By Chris Prunckle

AllNewWannabe_11_Web.jpg

Wannabe is a blog series by Chicago area artist Chris Prunckle documenting his trials and tribulations as a wannabe artist. Check back next week for a new posting.

Chris Prunckle is a graphic designer, illustrator and comic book artist banished to the suburbs of Chicago. Though an advertising industry minion by day, he slaves his nights away creating a mad little world.  He’s previously worked on the comics Fisted, Bonesetter, and The Scarab.  Follow him at @midjipress.

 

One afternoon I was sitting outside of a coffeeshop on Division drinking Hibiscus tea and reading a book titled “Adventures in The Skin Trade” when a man who looked to be about 70 leaned over and said, “Is that a sex book? It looks like a sex book.”

I laughed awkwardly, looked at the cover which had a beer bottle with someone’s pinky inside the neck of it, and said, “No! It's Dylan Thomas and it's kind of boring.”

"So, you like to read books?"

I nodded, wondering where this was going.

"I ask because they say the average American reads two books a year, if that. Probably less now with all this computer nonsense."

I turned that comment over in my head for a minute. He was probably right. Nobody reads books anymore. It was a depressing thought.

"You know Nelson Algren, the famous writer? He used to live down the street. He always wrote about Ashland and Division. Him and Simone De Beauvoir, you ever heard of her?"

I looked at him in surprise. “what? ...she used to hang out in Wicker Park?”

He nodded. “Oh sure…they had a secret affair.” He said somebody found all their love letters in the attic of that walk up flat on Evergreen.“ Johnny Depp paid millions of dollars for them. Wouldn’t be surprised if he makes a picture film.”

Love letters. I had written a few in my time. If only people wrote more letters these days.

He then asked me what I went to school for. I sheepishly said, “Screenwriting” as if that even counted. I had dropped out of two colleges.

"Ahh! So you are a screenwriter then?"

"Well, no. I am a horrible screenwriter. I don't have any ideas. I work in the music industry."

His face lit up. “Music!!”

He waved his arm up and down the street and asked if I knew who Clyde “Red” Foley was. I had no idea.

"He was a famous cowboy. Used to walk up and down Division St. with his guitar, playing outside of bars. People would throw money in his cowboy hat. At one time he was more famous than Johnny Cash."

Cowboys on Division Street?

"There were all kinds of musicians in this neighborhood, busking on the streets. Polka bands galore. Between Ashland and Damen there were 72 bars and all of’em had music and dancing."

He looked at my legs and said “You look like a dancer.” Did I like to dance?

I shook my head and admitted I wasn’t much of a dancer.

"Me, I was always good at two things. Dancing and stealing cars."

"Stealing cars?"

He became very serious. “Look at my face.

 


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