Curbside Splendor + Two Dollar Radio

  • Kramerbooks & Afterwords Cafe 1517 Connecticut Ave NW Washington, DC, 20036 United States

Curbside Splendor and Two Dollar Radio collaborate at Kramerbooks & Afterwords! Halle Butler and Susan Hope Lanier tour the east coast, stopping in Washington, DC to read alongside Sarah Gerard and David Connerley Nahm from one of our favorite, fellow indies.

About Jillian:

Megan, recently out of college and working a meaningless job as a gastroenterologist's secretary, openly hates all of her friends for being happy and successful. She makes herself feel better by obsessively critiquing the behavior of her coworker, Jillian, a rapid cycling, grotesque optimist, whose downfall is precipitated by the purchase of a dog.

About The Game We Play:

The ten riveting, emotionally complex stories in The Game We Play examine the decisions we make when our choices are few and courage is costly. A young couple faces disease and commitment with the same sharp fear, a neglected woman battles her worsening condition of a very real invisibility, and a father makes a split-second decision that puts his child's life at risk.

About Binary Star:

"Two lost souls hurtle through a long dark night where drug store fluorescents light up fashion magazine headlines and the bad flarf of the pharmacy: Hydroxycut, Seroquel, Ativan, Zantrex-3. Gerard’s young lovers rightly revolt against the insane standards of a sick society, but their pursuit of purity—ideological, mental, physical—comes to constitute another kind of impossible demand, all the more dangerous for being self-imposed. Binary Star is merciless and cyclonic, a true and brutal poem of obliteration, an all-American death chant whose chorus is 'I want to look at the sky and understand.'" — Justin Taylor, author of Flings

About Ancient Oceans of Central Kentucky:

Leah's little brother, Jacob, disappeared when the pair were younger, a tragedy that haunts her still. When a grown man arrives at the non-profit Leah directs claiming to be Jacob, she is wrenched back to her childhood, an iridescent tableau of family joy and strife, swimming at the lake, sneaking candy, late-night fears, and the stories told to quell them.

Ancient Oceans of Central Kentucky is a wrecking-ball of a novel that attempts to give meaning and poetry to everything that comprises small-town life in central Kentucky. Listen: they are the ghost stories that children tell one another, the litter that skirts the gulley, the lines at department stores.