Multi-Generational Artists Event with Art Shay, Tony Fitzpatrick, and Dmitry Samarov

  • The Hideout 1354 W Wabansia Ave Chicago, IL, 60642 United States

Join legendary artists Art Shay, Tony Fitzpatrick, and Dmitry Samarov as they discuss Chicago's influence on their work. Moderated by Chuck Sudo, editor-in-chief of Chicagoist.

ART SHAY: After flying fifty-three combat missions in World War II, Shay joined Life magazine as a staff reporter before leaving in 1951 to become one of American's leading photojournalists. His pictures regularly appeared in Life, Time, Fortune, and Sports Illustrated among many other magazines. Several have been singled out as among the most enduring American photographs ever taken.

TONY FITZPATRICK: Tony Fitzpatrick is best known for his multimedia collages, printmaking, paintings, and drawings. Fitzpatrick’s works are inspired by Chicago street culture, cities he has traveled to, children’s books, tattoo designs, and folk art. Fitzpatrick has authored or illustrated eight books of art and poetry, and, for the last two years, has written a column for Newcity. His art appears in the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, and the National Museum of American Art in Washington DC. Before making a living as an artist, Fitzpatrick worked as a radio host, bartender, boxer, construction worker, and film and stage actor.

DMITRY SAMAROV: Dmitry Samarov was born in Moscow, USSR in 1970. He immigrated to the US with his family in 1978. After a false start at Parsons School of Design in New York, he graduated with a BFA in painting and printmaking from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1993. Upon graduation he promptly began driving a cab—first in Boston, then after a time, in Chicago—which eventually led to the publication of his illustrated work memoir Hack: Stories from a Chicago Cab by University of Chicago Press in 2011. He has exhibited his work in all manner of bars, coffeeshops, libraries, and even the odd gallery (when he's really hard up). He no longer drives a cab.